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Why a PINK chef's coat?

Simply put, I carry my Dad's legacy with me through my cookbook, cooking and everyday I am writing my food columns, he is always with me. I carry my Mom with me through a silent reminder of her struggle with breast cancer that took her life, as well as the lives of many other women who have dealt with, and are still dealing with, this horrible affliction. Besides, why not pink? It makes a man look good!

Bay Path Brownies

These brownies are so named because they are my take on the Rocky Road Brownie. Using chestnuts is a great way of savoring Yankee flavor and with the substitution of blueberries in place of fat truly brings this recipe to a flavorful ending.

Replacing fat in brownies will not alter the fudgy outcome. Why? As with other baked desserts, when you combine flour and water in a recipe, gluten is formed. If all the flour was soaked with water and causing all the gluten to form, the end result would be a dense and heavy product. When you add fat, it prevents all the water from forming with the flour and causing too much gluten. The fat actually coats the flour, preventing water to come into contact with all the flour. Fat 'shortens' the gluten strands, which is why shortening is called......well, shortening. For cakes, this is essential for a light and airy texture.

Another function fat has in baking is the ability to trap air bubbles in a recipe, causing the end product to rise. For brownies, all this is irrelevant. So enjoy this true-tasting New England brownie without worry that the texture will be off because of the blueberries. The taste will more than make up for any apprehension.


For 1 people


  • Nonstick cooking spray
  • 3/4 cup(s) fresh or frozen blueberries, thawed
  • 2 cup(s) chocolate chips, divided
  • 4 eggs
  • 1 teaspoon(s) vanilla extract
  • 2 cup(s) sugar
  • 1 cup(s) flour
  • 3/4 cup(s) chopped, cooked chestnuts
  • 1/2 cup(s) peanut butter morsels
  • 3/4 cup(s) mini marshmallows

Bay Path Brownies Directions

  1. Coat an 8-inch-square baking pan with nonstick cooking spray; set aside. Place the blueberries in a blender or food processor container and puree until as smooth as possible, about 30 seconds. Either in a metal bowl placed over a pot of simmering water or in the microwave, melt 1 cup chocolate chips and pureed blueberries together, stirring to combine. If in a microwave, cook for 1 minute, stir and keep cooking at 15 second intervals until fully melted and mixed together. Remove from heat; set aside.
  2. In a large bowl, beat the eggs and vanilla together. Beat in the sugar until well incorporated. Slowly beat in the melted chocolate mixture on low, then add the flour in 2 batches, mixing until smooth with your beater on low. Scrape down the sides of the bowl, mix well and pour into you prepared pan.
  3. Evenly distribute the chestnuts, remainder of chocolate chips and peanut butter morsels. Bake 20-25 minutes or until the sides pull away and the center bounces back after being gently touched. Open oven door and pull out rack. Quickly distribute the marshmallows over the top evenly and place back into oven. Turn heat off and let continue cooking in the residual heat another 5-7 minutes, or until marshmallows are melted. Remove from oven and, well, enjoy!