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Simply put, I carry my Dad's legacy with me through my cookbook, cooking and everyday I am writing my food columns, he is always with me. I carry my Mom with me through a silent reminder of her struggle with breast cancer that took her life, as well as the lives of many other women who have dealt with, and are still dealing with, this horrible affliction. Besides, why not pink? It makes a man look good!

Chinese Red Cooked Ribs

Chinese 5-spice powder has been a staple in Asian cooking for centuries. So called, not for its spices, but because it stands for the 5 elements that are present all around us. Wood, earth, metal, water and fire, which are the elements that are needed to keep yourself in check, according to ancient Chinese medicine, or you will suffer from a wide variety of illnesses and ailments.

Because there are literally hundreds of "perfect" Chinese barbecue sauces, I would like to offer you two of my all-time favorites. They both are true Chinese red barbecue sauces but the second recipe has ketchup added, for those of you who think tomato shoud be the base of ALL barbecue sauces.

Although I, as a Yankee, adore recipe number two because of the addition of molasses, this first recipe is absolutely perfect and mimicks the ribs you enjoy at any Chinese restaurant.

These sauces are enough for 2-3 pounds beef short ribs, slab baby back or spareribs

Ingredients

For 4 people

Recipe

  • Red Marinade Number 1:
  • lb(s) beef short ribs, slab baby back or spareribs
  • 1 cup(s) soy sauce
  • 1/2 cup(s) brown sugar, packed
  • 1 cup(s) apple juice or cider
  • 1/2 cup(s) apple cider vinegar
  • 2 teaspoon(s) red pepper flakes or cayenne pepper, or to taste
  • 2 teaspoon(s) Chinese 5-spice powder
  • 1 teaspoon(s) dried ginger(or 1 tablespoon minced fresh)
  • 1 teaspoon(s) garlic powder
  • 5 drops red food coloring
  • Red Marinade Number 2:
  • 1 (12-ounce)bottle ketchup
  • 1/3 cup(s) hoisin sauce
  • 1/3 cup(s) soy sauce
  • 1/4 cup(s) dry sherry
  • 1 tablespoon(s) Worcestershire sauce
  • 2 teaspoon(s) garlic powder
  • 1/4 cup(s) molasees
  • 3 drops red food coloring
  • 1 teaspoon(s) Chinese 5-spice powder
  • 1 teaspoon(s) grated orange rind
  • Juice from 1 orange

Chinese Red Cooked Ribs Directions

  1. You can either use uncut ribs or have your butcher cut them in half or even thirds, like I do. If using baby back or spare ribs, you can either marinade the rack of ribs as is and cut them into individual servngs after cooking or cut them previous to marinating and cooking.
  2. At least 4 hours before cooking, whisk together all ingredients except ribs. Place your ribs in a large pan with at least 2-inch sides in a single layer. Pour marinade over the top, turn the ribs a few times to refrigerate at least 4 hours. or until you are ready to cook.
  3. When ready, heat your grill to about medium hot. Take the ribs directly from the marinade onto  the cooking racks, shaking excess liquid from ribs. Make sure the heat source is at least 3-inches from ribs. Close it up and start cooking, basting every 5 minutes with marinade, turning over every time you baste. After 30 minutes, start checking for doneness. They should be prefect at about 35-40 minutes.
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